Search


Isn't Triangle Pose a brother of Pyramid Pose? Now in Triangle Pose, you feel the stretch at the inner thigh too. There is also a little twist in the spine in Triangle Pose.


Triangle Pose is very popular in Yoga classes nowadays. I love this pose because it not only stretches the leg: hamstring & inner thigh, but also an awesome stretch at the side of the torso. However, also because the pose stretches these parts out, it's hard for stiff people to hold Triangle Pose putting their hand on the floor. The first option for stiff people then is to bend the front knee just a little bit, enough to still feel the stretch without all the intense feeling.



Or keep your front knee straight but lift your torso up and put your lower hand on a block, instead of on the floor.


Many Yoga beginners are stiff on the side of the body. Then they can do Triangle Pose at even a higher position with their hand on their thigh instead of on the block. This is already stretchy for someone, and a great start for your Yoga journey. As you do Triangle Pose over and over again, and as you gain flexibility in other Yoga poses too, you can go deeper.




Try doing Triangle Pose in Yoga without putting your hand on anything. Keep your arms around your face, or hold a strap. Now, you are not only stretching but also building strength in one side of the body and on the leg too.


Beware of hyperextension in the knee joint of the front leg in Triangle Pose. That's when your leg is no longer ¨straight¨, but bending in the opposite direction. If you are very flexible and tend to have hyperextension in the joints, my suggestion is that if you raise both arms over your head, micro bend your knee to bring your knee out of the unstable position.


------------------------------------------------------

Thank you for reading! More about how to Prop Up Standing Poses in Yoga:


See how I use basic Yoga props to do ANY Yoga poses in my Prop Up Project:

  1. Grounding Poses in Yoga

  2. Yoga Poses in the Sun Salutations

  3. Basic Standing Poses

  4. Standing Balance Poses

  5. Core Yoga Poses

  6. Backbends in Yoga

  7. Twists in Yoga

  8. Forward Bends in Yoga

  9. Arm Balance in Yoga

  10. Inversion in Yoga

Prop Up Project from Ha My Yoga to help you do more than 80 Yoga poses easier and more effectively with simple Yoga props like block, strap, wall, blanket, bolster, etc. So you can really enjoy doing Yoga!

Do you find this post helpful? Share to your social media!


Pyramid Pose in Yoga - a classic hamstring stretch Yoga pose. I love the geometrical shape of this pose.



I love Pyramid pose because it stretches the hamstring muscle of my front leg. My hamstring is relatively short, but I understand that I'm more flexible than an average person. So I can see that to many Yoga beginners, Pyramid Pose is a lot of stretchy feeling.


Let me first tell you the story of people who were born with a long hamstring. I have met some of them, they can do a split with their hips on the floor without any warm-up. That's why in Yoga class, we are told not to compare our Yoga pose to other people's, but instead focus on feeling your own pose.


So what is the hamstring? It's a large muscle covering the whole backside of the leg, with one end connecting to the sit bones and the other end in the middle of the shinbone. Nowadays with the modern lifestyle, we sit a lot, and when we sit, we bend the knees all the time, which shortens the hamstring. Short hamstring happens also to sporty people who train a lot of running, weightlifting, etc. However, in the first case, the hamstring is weak and tight. In the second case, the hamstring is strong and tight. For most people who just start Yoga, they have tight hamstring.


So what do you do in Pyramid pose if you have tight hamstring? Bend your front knee. That doesn't mean you are not stretching, you still stretch even with your knee bend. Keep your front knee bent and try to pull the sitting bone (your buttock) back, you still stretch the hamstring at the thicker part of it. Bend your knee to different angle to aim the stretch to the whole hamstring, remember it's a long, large muscle. As you progress with Yoga, you will be able to straighten your leg one day.


You can touch the floor with your fingertips, or hold blocks. I absolutely go for the block option because it gives us space to ¨straighten¨ the back so that we can feel the action of flexing at the hip. Therefore we can bring the sitting bone higher to stretch the hamstring more effectively.

It doesn't matter if the heel of your back foot is on the floor or lifted. What matters is that you keep your hips ¨square¨ so that you flex your hip and stretch the hamstring of the front leg. Choose the suitable side of the blocks for your body.


For Yoga beginners who are stiff, you don't even have to hold blocks on the floor. Keep your spine neutral and flex your hip. Just leaning forward a little bit feels stretchy already for the hamstring of the front leg.


The person on the right photo is stretching very much even though he doesn't ¨look¨ so. If we don't have access to Yoga blocks, we can hold hands at the shinbone, or thigh bone. You can also hold hands at your hips to feel your hips equal on both sides (square hip).


Pyramid Pose in Yoga also stretches the ankle of the front leg. If it's too much for your body, put your foot on a block to make it less intense.



One very stable prop that we can use in Yoga: the wall. Instead of holding your hands at your hips, on the floor, on your leg, etc., you can put your hands on a wall to support Pyramid Pose. This makes it even easier to keep your back straight (neutral spine) for the hip flexion action to stretch the hamstring more efficiently. Once your body get used to it and gains more flexibility, increase the stretch by flexing more at your hip and flexing at the spine too. Walk the hands down on the wall to encourage deeper forward bend.

------------------------------------------------------

Thank you for reading! More about how to Prop Up Standing Poses in Yoga:



See how I use basic Yoga props to do ANY Yoga poses in my Prop Up Project:

  1. Grounding Poses in Yoga

  2. Yoga Poses in the Sun Salutations

  3. Basic Standing Poses

  4. Standing Balance Poses

  5. Core Yoga Poses

  6. Backbends in Yoga

  7. Twists in Yoga

  8. Forward Bends in Yoga

  9. Arm Balance in Yoga

  10. Inversion in Yoga


Prop Up Project from Ha My Yoga to help you do more than 80 Yoga poses easier and more effectively with simple Yoga props like block, strap, wall, blanket, bolster, etc. So you can really enjoy doing Yoga!


Do you find this post helpful? Share to your social media!


Updated: Mar 7, 2020

In this post, we talk about the Extended Side Angle pose in Yoga and the bounded variation. Also a story of my hypermobile knee and ankle and that one time I hurt my knee in doing this Yoga pose. From the story, some short introduction about ligaments in the joints.


UTTHITA PARSVAKONASANA - EXTENDED SIDE ANGLE


In Sanskrit, Utthita means Extended. You will see this name again in Triangle pose: Utthita Trikonasana. Extended refers to the arms. This Yoga pose Extended Side Angle is a brother of Warrior 2. They have exactly the same legs, and they often come together in a Yoga flow.


A story about that one time I hurt my knee so bad that I fell out of THIS SIMPLE pose and just rolling on the floor screaming. Yes, this simple Side Angle pose. I have very mobile ankle and knee joints, they tend to collapse in. I have flat feet, and in ¨simple¨ Yoga poses like Warrior 2, I just ¨hang¨ in the pose. I don't even have to try at all to be in Warrior 2, so I put too little attention and strength to my back legs.


Until that one day when I was just hanging out in Warrior 2, and changed suddenly to a Side Angle, a sharp pain attacked me in my back knee. It was so shockingly painful that I fell on the floor screaming. For a few minutes, it felt weird and painful. I was on the floor for a long time until I started moving my leg again. I was so scared that I hurt a ligament in the knee joint (who knows why), but luckily the next day I could extend my knee normally again.


About ligament in the joints: Ligaments are thin string connecting the bones at the joints. At the knee joints, between the thigh bone and shin bone, there are 4 ligaments. Unlike muscles that are elastic, ligaments are not elastic, and moreover, there's not much blood circulation into ligaments. Therefore a ligament injury takes very long to recover, and some don't even recover. The great news is that in Yoga, because the movements are so slow, we don't have bad accidents that injure ligaments. However, the injury in Yoga is about wear and tear, an impact that happens so slowly onto the joints until one day it bursts into pain.


After the weird pain happened to me, I always pay attention to activate my leg muscles to maintain stability at the knee and ankle joints. From gaining the good posture, I also feel more strength and stability in my legs in Warrior 2.


There are many variations for the arms in Side Angle pose. Many Yoga beginners find it hard to reach their hands to the floor because they are tight in the hips or the side of their torso. A simple way without using a prop is to rest the elbow on the knee. Now that the torso is in a higher position, it's less tense. Notice: don't press the upper body weight down to your elbow but rather strengthen your torso so that it has its own strength.


USE BLOCK to put your hand on instead of hand on the floor. Blocks often have 3 sides for you to choose. In the left photo, holding the block at its high side but he is feeling a lot of stretch in the hip and the side torso. However, as he progresses in Yoga, he will move on to use shorter sizes of the block and eventually maybe touch the floor.



EXTENDED SIDE ANGLE POSE, BOUNDED VARIATION


Bounded Side Angle is a very common variation of the pose. You bring your arms behind and try to hold the hands. The arms make a bind around the whole body. However, not everyone can perform the bounded hands for a lack of joint mobility in the shoulders or the hips. A special feature of the pose is a little twist when we turn our chest up.


To start with the bound, just do half bound with your upper arm. The lower arm can hold blocks if there's not enough mobility in the hips or shoulders. The top hand reaches behind on our back. Turn chest up and move shoulder behind to encourage more shoulder opening.



One more step towards the bound is to hold a strap as a connection between the hands. This is one step further from Half Bound to Full Bound. Once you can hold the strap, walk your hands closer towards each other for progress. Until one day, you hold your hands into a real Bound.


------------------------------------------------------

Thank you for reading! More about Basic Standing Poses in Yoga:


See how I use basic Yoga props to do ANY Yoga poses in my Prop Up Project:

  1. Grounding Poses in Yoga

  2. Yoga Poses in the Sun Salutations

  3. Basic Standing Poses

  4. Standing Balance Poses

  5. Core Yoga Poses

  6. Backbends in Yoga

  7. Twists in Yoga

  8. Forward Bends in Yoga

  9. Arm Balance in Yoga

  10. Inversion in Yoga


Prop Up Project from Ha My Yoga to help you do more than 80 Yoga poses easier and more effectively with simple Yoga props like block, strap, wall, blanket, bolster, etc. So you can really enjoy doing Yoga!


Do you find the post helpful? Share to your social media!

contact

Ha-My Le, RYT500 Vinyasa Yoga teacher

Tel. +46 76 401 46 26

Email to hamyyoga@gmail.com

Add 1: Torpgatan 21

Add 2: Ribevägen 17

Malmö, Sweden

social media

© 2021 by Ha My Yoga. Proudly created with Wix.com